Wednesday, 8 October 2014

Plastic Scenery Review - part 2


I'm currently reviewing Tabletop Workshop's Monastic Scenery set, which I got hold of at the weekend. You can read part 1 here, which includes the rather lovely chapel piece.



Next on the list is the Medieval Cottage. It follows a similar style to the chapel – the pieces are loose in the box and the instructions are printed on the inside of the lid. There are six pieces that fit together exactly the same way that the chapel does.



It took a similar 10 seconds to build the cottage and the scale is perfect for my 28mm models.



Inside is nicely detailed, though I'm not sure my villagers could afford stone flooring (all these kits use the same floor piece). The side walls are quite low compared to the chapel, which makes access much easier without the need to remove a wall.



As you know I already own a 4Ground cottage, so was interested to see how they compare. As you can see there's not a lot in it. The 4Ground cottage is a little taller (the side walls certainly are) and the door opens. The TW plastic has more detail across the board but I much prefer the 'teddy fur' roof to the plastic one, which looks a bit too 'soft' and plastic and not as real. I may buy some fur and stick it over the plastic to try and match the 4Ground style. The walls in between the batons of the TW cottage are very smooth – too smooth – so I will have to employ my liquid greenstuff technique again to add some texture.

Having said all that the TW cottage is still a fantastic kit and well worth a look.



The Stable kit uses many of the same pieces as the Cottage – in fact only the walls are different. It's a clever idea to save on production costs but does mean that your buildings are the same size, which is a bit of a shame.



The new wall pieces are very detailed, as I'm learning to expect from TW, with tools leaning up agains the batons. One side is quite open which gives some great cinematic opportunities with archers.



Scale is obviously identical to the other pieces and again it's a lovely bit of kit.



The Barn kit is virtually identical to the Stable, with only a single wall different.



The same tools lean against the wall as in the Stable, but this time we have a double door front. This kit more than any other could have done with opening doors. I'm not sure how much of an extra expense it would have been, but it did feel like a bit of a missed opportunity. 



Also, the Barn being the same size as the Cottage didn't feel quite right. However, TW have managed to squeeze three building out of fundamentally the same kit so that is a major bonus.



Together, as a whole, the Monastic set sits together very well. Once painted and a bit of scenery added it will look rather stunning rather quickly. The set of four buildings came in at £50 with free P&P – that's just £12.50 each!

They all snap together very easily and have plenty of detail to make painting a breeze and a joy. As you can see my Citadel trees sit comfortably alongside them as do the 4Ground buildings so it's a win on every front.


The one thing that's got me frothing now is… if this is how good the small buildings are, how stunning is the castle going to be?!!

Next post I'll try and get some photos of the buildings next to slightly different scale models – GW Fantasy, Reaper, Darksword, etc.


9 comments:

  1. Shame about the doors. GW did very well with the sector imperialis terrain where the plastic round the doors was thin enough to cut with a knife giving you the choice about open or close and with a little work could be made to move. Any likely hood of that with these kits? or will cutting the doors out likely ruin them or their frame?

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    1. I shall investigate further and post my findings later in the week.

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  2. You're not helping my resolve Mike! I may have to add these to the Birthday wish list.

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  3. looks good. If you was to base these you could alter the size of the buildings by perhaps extending them with some scratchbuilt bits such as lean-tos. Water barrels, log piles or carts haystacks etc

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    1. That is a very good idea, although it negates one of the strengths of these kits which is the ease and speed of getting them built and completed. Might have to try that though.

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  4. You've made me want the castle. Quite a lot!

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    1. Oh yes! Watch this space… there may be a review before the end of the year ;)

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    2. I'll look forward to that. My wife probably won't...

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